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Matcha – Cultivation

Matcha – Cultivation

This is part 2 of a 6 post series on matcha contributed to World of Tea by Tyas Sōsen. While the episode in the previous article allows us an insight in the advent of tea in Japan, it also introduces some of the most important factors that play a decisive role in the cultivation of tea bushes for the manufacturing of matcha. In this article, I will look to define the traditional aspects of cultivating tea bushes for matcha, as well as to introduce how these methods have been altered to meet contemporary standards. But first, I feel that it is necessary to...

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Caffeine And Tea

Caffeine And Tea

Originally called "theine", caffeine was first discovered in tea in 1827. It was later shown that the "theine" of tea was identical with the caffeine of coffee, and the term "theine" was then dropped. While the caffeine in tea and coffee are, technically, identical, the experience is different due to three key factors: 1. There is significantly less caffeine in the average cup of tea - especially when including green and white teas, as these are brewed at shorter times and cooler temperatures. 2. L-theanine, an amino acid found only in tea, has a relaxing effect that counteracts the jitteriness of caffeine...

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Matcha – Harvest

Matcha – Harvest

This is part 3 of a 6 post series on matcha contributed to World of Tea by Tyas Sōsen. Traditionally, May 2nd is considered the 88th fortnight calculated from the beginning of Spring. In terms of matcha production, this is the most favorable date for harvest. Around this time, about two fresh leaves and a bud have developed and matured sufficiently to be ready for harvest. The larger the leaf becomes, the more sunlight it has savored, and in effect has had more time to generate antioxidants which will render the leaf more bitter. It are only the top two leaves...

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Matcha – The Right Blend

Matcha – The Right Blend

This is part 5 of a 6 post series on matcha contributed to World of Tea by Tyas Sōsen. Most tea farmers that produce tencha, only manufacture the tea until the ara-tencha, or the stage before the final processing where the rough dried tea leaf is further processed, cut and filtered. At this stage, the leaf is still too large to be successfully ground into fine powder, and the twigs may catch in the veins of the stone mortar, disturbing the smooth pulverizing of the tea. Therefore, before tencha can be processed into matcha, the leaf that is obtained from a...

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Which one are you?

Which one are you?

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